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Google Domains DNS Setup Guide

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    Overview

    This guide demonstrates how to add a root domain or subdomain to Google Domains and configure the (sub)domain with each Mailgun DNS record. This guide assumes that you have already created your Google Domains account.

    While this guide is intended to be as helpful and comprehensive as possible, there is a small possibility that you will encounter an error or issue of some kind while configuring your DNS records within Google Domains. If that is the case, we recommend contacting Google Domains' Support Team as they will be able to most quickly identify and resolve the issue (or, at minimum, provide next steps).

     

    Deciding between a root domain or subdomain

    Deciding which domain to use - especially whether to use your root domain or a subdomain of that root domain - is key before proceeding any further. As this can be a challenging decision to make, we recommend reviewing the following Mailgun articles if needed:

    Nevertheless, let's briefly review two key terms: root domains and subdomains.

    Examples of root domains include mailgun.com, mydnsexample.com, or google.com. Examples of subdomains include relay.mailgun.com, mg.mydnsexample.com, or mail.google.com. Notice the pattern: subdomains have an extra prefix (or sometimes multiple prefixes) before the primary domain name itself. In most cases using a subdomain with Mailgun is preferred, but we cover this topic more comprehensively in the above articles.

    Finally, once a decision has been reached, add the (sub)domain to your Mailgun account, and our system will generate the various DNS records needed . We cover adding (and deleting) domains in detail within this in-depth guide.

     

    Adding the domain

    There are two methods of adding a domain or subdomain within Google Domains:

    1. Method 1: Registering a new domain/subdomain with Google Domains
    2. Method 2: Transferring an existing (sub)domain's registration from another Domain Registrar to Google Domains

    The first method of adding a (sub)domain within the Google Domains Control Panel only takes 5 steps, and this is the method covered in this guide. We will list those steps below, but if desired, you can also reference Google Domain's Adding (Buying) A Domain articles. If you already have a domain purchased and registered elsewhere, you'll need to transfer the domain to Google Domains (see the next paragraph).

    However, the second method of adding a (sub)domain within the Google Domains Control Panel is not covered in this article; nonetheless, Google Domains documents how the transfer process works within their system. Transferring a domain's registration between Domain Registrars is an intricate process, and a mistake can have catastrophic impact upon your online presence. Therefore, it is our recommendation to contact the Domain Registrar if you have any questions or encounter any issues regarding with the Domain Registration and Nameserver Management processes. See also section "The Domain Registrar And Nameserver Records" of the guide for more details.

    A third method, configuring an existing (sub)domain's nameservers within the Domain Registrar to reference Google Domains rather than the current DNS provider, is not possible within Google Domains' system.

    Tip: For larger images, right-click and select the option "Open Image in New Tab" (or Window).

     

    1. Login to your account.
      GoogleDomains.01.Login.png
    2. If not already selected, click the Get a new domain option on the left-hand navigation pane. Then, enter the new domain name you wish to add (buy/purchase) from Google Domains inside the center textbox.
      GoogleDomains.02.NewRegistration.AddDomain(Step1).png
    3. Choose the desired domain ending (.TLD) for your domain. Then, click the shopping cart circular icon (located to the right of the heart circular icon), which adds the domain to your Google shopping cart.
      GoogleDomains.02.NewRegistration.AddDomain(Step2).png
    4. Choose the desired options in your cart and proceed to the next page.
      GoogleDomains.02.NewRegistration.AddDomain(Step3).png
    5. Enter your contact information for ICANN and complete the domain registration process.
      GoogleDomains.02.NewRegistration.AddDomain(Step4).png

     

    Configuring the domain

    Once the domain has been added, you may access it in the future using the following steps.

    1. If you're shown the My domains page upon login, you'll see a list of domains in the center of the page. Click the Manage link found within the row that contains the domain name in question.
      GoogleDomains.03.ManageDomain(Step1).png
    2. Click the DNS option on the left-hand navigation pane.
      GoogleDomains.03.ManageDomain(Step2).png
    3. View, create, or edit the desired DNS records for the domain within the Resource records section in the middle of the page.
      GoogleDomains.03.ManageDomain(Step3).png

     

    Configuring SPF

    SPF records help protect your domain against spoofed emails and decrease* the likelihood your emails will be flagged as spam. (* Exceptions apply: e.g. actual spam/phishing emails will still be considered as such by mailbox providers even with the presence of an SPF record.)

    Additionally to our guide, Google Domains does provide their own SPF tutorial (though it is generalized for each type of record in their system). Interested in more extensive technical details concerning SPF records? Please reference this Mailgun article, RFC 7208, or Google Domains' technical documentation

    Tip: For larger images, right-click and select the option "Open Image in New Tab" (or Window).

     

    Configuring a root domain with the SPF record

    GoogleDomains.04.ConfigureSPF(Rootdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the SPF record information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example domain called mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name
    (no value is entered in this field)

    Notes:

    • Leaving the textbox empty with no value present is used to represent a root (apex) domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use this quite different value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    SPF

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    v=spf1 include:mailgun.org ~all
    (or, possibly only include:mailgun.org)

    Notes:

    • If you do not already have an existing SPF record for this root domain, you'll enter the entire value:
      • v=spf1 include:mailgun.org ~all
    • If you already have an existing SPF record for this root domain, you'll instead insert a smaller section of the value:
      • include:mailgun.org

      • Ensure this text occurs after v=spf1 and before ~all

      • Ensure this text has one space character to it's left and one space character to it's right

      • For example, v=spf1 include:domain1.com include:mailgun.org include:domain3.com ~all

    • If desired, you may use -all (hard fail) instead of ~all (soft fail). Using either will have no impact on the domain's verification status within Mailgun's system.

    • Once the SPF record is saved, Google Domains will show the data enclosed with a pair of double-quotes. This is normal within their system, although the actual value of the field does not include the pair of double-quotes.

     

    Configuring a subdomain with the SPF record

    GoogleDomains.04.ConfigureSPF(Subdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the SPF record information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example subdomain called mg.mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name

    mg

    Notes:

    • The text "mg", without the root domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) suffixed, is used to represent a subdomain (e.g. mg.mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use the shorter value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, once the text for the Hostname is entered, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    SPF

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    v=spf1 include:mailgun.org ~all
    (or, possibly only include:mailgun.org)

    Notes:

    • If you do not already have an existing SPF record for this root domain, you'll enter the entire value:
      • v=spf1 include:mailgun.org ~all
    • If you already have an existing SPF record for this root domain, you'll instead insert a smaller section of the value:
      • include:mailgun.org

      • Ensure this text occurs after v=spf1 and before ~all

      • Ensure this text has one space character to it's left and one space character to it's right

      • For example, v=spf1 include:domain1.com include:mailgun.org include:domain3.com ~all

    • If desired, you may use -all (hard fail) instead of ~all (soft fail). Using either will have no impact on the domain's verification status within Mailgun's system.

    • Once the SPF record is saved, Google Domains will show the data enclosed with a pair of double-quotes. This is normal within their system, although the actual value of the field does not include the pair of double-quotes.

     

    Configuring DKIM

    DKIM records help authenticate your domain against forged emails and decrease* the likelihood your emails will be flagged as spam. (* Exceptions apply: e.g. actual spam/phishing emails will still be considered as such by mailbox providers even with the presence of an DKIM record.)

    Additionally to our guide, Google Domains does provide their own DKIM tutorial (though it is generalized for each type of record in their system). Interested in more extensive technical details concerning DKIM records? Please reference this Mailgun article, RFC 6376, or Google Domains' technical documentation

    Tip: For larger images, right-click and select the option "Open Image in New Tab" (or Window).

     

    Configuring a root domain with the DKIM record

    GoogleDomains.05.ConfigureDKIM(Rootdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the DKIM record information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example domain called mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name

    pic._domainkey
    (or, one of several other values such as krs._domainkey, smtp._domainkey, or mailo._domainkey)

    Notes:

    • Your Hostname could be one among a range of other values:
      • krs._domainkey
      • smtp._domainkey
      • mailo._domainkey
      • etc. As such, only use the value Mailgun has assigned for your domain.
    • The text "pic._domainkey", without the root domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) suffixed, is used to represent a subdomain (e.g. pic._domainkey.mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use the shorter value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, once the text for the Hostname is entered, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    TXT

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    k=rsa; p=MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUA
    A4GNADCBiRgK1eQ/xth8dqLiuzqwmNBI+
    TPmpq71Yka2ZNh7Iws8gsbqEGvRmT5KT
    mZcXwW9BOK8emkBacGxINayXbeg2K2J
    0J0WrTFJvRXZnykmDpLzhpSAyeValF6jFF
    p8cUFyNmCAUnjwIDAQAB
    (your domain's value certainly will be different)

    Notes:

    • Within Mailgun, you can create either a 1024- or 2048-bit DKIM key.
      • However, not all DNS providers support 2048-bit DKIM keys. Further, some providers who do support 2048-bit DKIM keys require splitting a key over 2 records (due to a 255 byte character limit associated with the value of the DKIM).

      • Google Domains does support 2048-bit DKIM keys.

      • Further, Google Domains allows you to enter the full 2048-bit DKIM key into the Data field, and they will split the key into 2 records automatically on your behalf.
      • Manually splitting a 2048-bit DKIM key over two records generally can be performed by following the main steps of this article.
      • However, the DNS provider themselves will be the best resource for any assistance needed with this more uncommon, advanced DNS configuration.
    • v=dkim1 is not used in our records since dkim1 is the only version that exists at this time.
    • Once the DKIM record is saved, Google Domains will show the data enclosed with a pair of double-quotes. This is normal within their system, although the actual value of the field does not include the pair of double-quotes.

     

    Configuring a subdomain with the DKIM record

    GoogleDomains.05.ConfigureDKIM(Subdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the DKIM record information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example subdomain called mg.mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name

    pic._domainkey.mg
    (or, one of several other values such as krs._domainkey.mg, smtp._domainkey.mg, or mailo._domainkey.mg)

    Notes:

    • Your Hostname could be one among a range of other values:
      • krs._domainkey.mg
      • smtp._domainkey.mg
      • mailo._domainkey.mg
      • etc. As such, only use the value Mailgun has assigned for your domain.
    • The text "pic._domainkey.mg", without the root domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) suffixed, is used to represent a subdomain (e.g. pic._domainkey.mg.mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use the shorter value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, once the text for the Hostname is entered, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    TXT

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    k=rsa; p=MIGfMA0GCSqGSIb3DQEBAQUA
    A4GNADCBiRgK1eQ/xth8dqLiuzqwmNBI+
    TPmpq71Yka2ZNh7Iws8gsbqEGvRmT5KT
    mZcXwW9BOK8emkBacGxINayXbeg2K2J
    0J0WrTFJvRXZnykmDpLzhpSAyeValF6jFF
    p8cUFyNmCAUnjwIDAQAB
    (your domain's value certainly will be different)

    Notes:

    • Within Mailgun, you can create either a 1024- or 2048-bit DKIM key.
      • However, not all DNS providers support 2048-bit DKIM keys. Further, some providers who do support 2048-bit DKIM keys require splitting a key over 2 records (due to a 255 byte character limit associated with the value of the DKIM).

      • Google Domains does support 2048-bit DKIM keys.

      • Further, Google Domains allows you to enter the full 2048-bit DKIM key into the Data field, and they will split the key into 2 records automatically on your behalf.
      • Manually splitting a 2048-bit DKIM key over two records generally can be performed by following the main steps of this article.
      • However, the DNS provider themselves will be the best resource for any assistance needed with this more uncommon, advanced DNS configuration.
    • v=dkim1 is not used in our records since dkim1 is the only version that exists at this time.
    • Once the DKIM record is saved, Google Domains will show the data enclosed with a pair of double-quotes. This is normal within their system, although the actual value of the field does not include the pair of double-quotes.

     

    Configuring MX

    MX records describe where emails intended for your domain should be sent.

    Additionally to our guide, Google Domains does provide their own MX tutorial (though it is generalized for each type of record in their system). Interested in more extensive technical details concerning MX records? Please reference RFC 5321 or Google Domains' technical documentation

    Tip: For larger images, right-click and select the option "Open Image in New Tab" (or Window).

     

    Configuring a root domain with the MX records

    GoogleDomains.06.ConfigureMX(Rootdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the MX records information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example domain called mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name


    (no value is entered in this field)

    Notes:

    • Leaving the textbox empty with no value present is used to represent a root (apex) domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use this quite different value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    MX

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    10 mxa.mailgun.org
    (for the first MX record)

    10 mxb.mailgun.org
    (for the second MX record)

    Notes:

    • Keep in mind there are two MX records, and the only difference between them will be this field. The first record will have mxa.mailgun.org and the second record will have mxb.mailgun.org.

    • Both records can have any priority (as long as they are the same priority), but 10 is a standard value. Other DNS providers typically have Priority as a separate field rather than combined into the Data field like Google Domains.
    • Ensure that only Mailgun's MX records are configured for your domain.
      • Having another email provider's or email host's MX records also present will result in unpredictable email delivery to your domain (in short, lost emails).
      • As such, if your domain already has non-Mailgun MX records, it is almost always the best and safest course of action to use a different domain - or ideally a subdomain - for Mailgun instead.
    • Though the MX records are "technically optional" for using Mailgun's system, they are "virtually required" for optimal email deliverability and the avoidance of certain types of bounces (such as those due to Sender Address Verification).

     

    Configuring a subdomain with the MX records

    GoogleDomains.06.ConfigureMX(Subdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the MX records information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example subdomain called mg.mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name

    mg

    Notes:

    • The text "mg", without the root domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) suffixed, is used to represent a subdomain (e.g. mg.mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use the shorter value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    MX

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    10 mxa.mailgun.org
    (for the first MX record)

    10 mxb.mailgun.org
    (for the second MX record)

    Notes:

    • Keep in mind there are two MX records, and the only difference between them will be this field. The first record will have mxa.mailgun.org and the second record will have mxb.mailgun.org.

    • Both records can have any priority (as long as they are the same priority), but 10 is a standard value. Other DNS providers typically have Priority as a separate field rather than combined into the Data field like Google Domains.
    • Ensure that only Mailgun's MX records are configured for your subdomain.
      • Having another email provider's or email host's MX records also present will result in unpredictable email delivery to your domain (in short, lost emails).
      • As such, if your domain already has non-Mailgun MX records, it is almost always the best and safest course of action to use a different domain - or ideally a subdomain - for Mailgun instead.
    • Though the MX records are "technically optional" for using Mailgun's system, they are "virtually required" for optimal email deliverability and the avoidance of certain types of bounces (such as those due to Sender Address Verification).

     

    Configuring CNAME

    CNAME records alias (point or direct) one domain name to another domain name, which in this case effectively associates your emails with Mailgun and allows tracking of opens and clicks.

    Additionally to our guide, Google Domains does provide their own CNAME tutorial (though it is generalized for each type of record in their system). Interested in more extensive technical details concerning MX records? Please reference RFC 1034 or Google Domains' technical documentation.

    Tip: For larger images, right-click and select the option "Open Image in New Tab" (or Window).

     

    Configuring a root domain with the CNAME record

    GoogleDomains.07.ConfigureCNAME(Rootdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the CNAME record information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example domain called mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name

    email

    Notes:

    • It is possible to change this value - what we call the Tracking Hostname - from "email" to another value of your choosing within the Mailgun Control Panel or through the Domains API.
      • In the Control Panel, click the Sending option in the left-hand navigation pane.

      • Click the Domain settings suboption in the same left-hand navigation pane.

      • In the Tracking section of the resulting page, you'll find the Tracking hostname field, which you can proceed to edit.
    • The text "email", without the root domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) suffixed, is used to represent a subdomain (e.g. email.mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use the shorter value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, once the text for the Hostname is entered, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    CNAME

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs. 
    Data

    mailgun.org

    Notes:

    • Ensure that only Mailgun's CNAME record is configured for your domain.
      • Having another CNAME record also present will result in unpredictable aliasing of your domain (in short, unreliable downstream behavior).
      • Some DNS providers automatically create a CNAME record for the "email" hostname. It may not always be safe to remove or edit such a record.
      • As such, if your domain already has a non-Mailgun CNAME record, it is almost always the best and safest course of action to use a different domain - or ideally a subdomain - for Mailgun instead.
    • Ensure that the only DNS record configured for the Hostname is the CNAME record.
      • Since the behavior of a CNAME is to alias (point or redirect) requests somewhere else, any other DNS records configured on the same Hostname will never be "seen".
      • When DNS lookups are performed by the services that interact with websites and emails, their lookups are aliased/redirected to another hostname instead. 
      • This would lead to any such records being unverifiable by Mailgun's system as well as hidden from email hosts who upon receipt of an email will attempt to verify whether your domain has the expected DNS records present.
      • As such, if the Hostname your CNAME record is configured on has any other DNS records, it is almost always the best and safest course of action to change the Hostname from "email" to another value that is not used by your other DNS records. 
      • The Hostname row (above) in this table explains how to change this value. Once changed, you can proceed with adding the Mailgun CNAME record.
    • Though the CNAME record is "optional" for using Mailgun's system, it is "required" for tracking the open and click rates of your emails as well as rewriting links using HTTPS rather than HTTP.

     

    Configuring a subdomain with the CNAME record

    GoogleDomains.07.ConfigureCNAME(Subdomain).png

    Within your Google Domains Control Panel, enter the CNAME record information that is displayed in your Mailgun Control Panel. (In the Mailgun Control Panel, you'll click on the Sending option followed by the Domain settings suboption found within in the left-hand navigation pane, and then click on the DNS records tab).

    Both the image above and the table below - using an example subdomain called mg.mydnsexample.com - provide additional guidance for adapting certain values (such as the Hostname) into Google Domains' system. Other DNS nuances and problematic scenarios that you may encounter are also explained in detail. Generally, the bolded-in-blue-text within the table can be copied-and-pasted for each field, unless it is noted otherwise (such as the DKIM value, which is unique for every Mailgun domain). 

    Please note: when configuring a new DNS record for a domain within Google Domains, you must click the "Create new record" link (imaged in the screenshot above); otherwise, you will modify an existing DNS record.

    Field Enter
    Host name

    email.mg

    Notes:

    • It is possible to change this value - what we call the Tracking Hostname - from "email" to another value of your choosing within the Mailgun Control Panel or through the Domains API.
      • In the Control Panel, click the Sending option in the left-hand navigation pane.

      • Click the Domain settings suboption in the same left-hand navigation pane.

      • In the Tracking section of the resulting page, you'll find the Tracking hostname field, which you can proceed to edit.
    • The text "email.mg", without the root domain (e.g. mydnsexample.com) suffixed, is used to represent a subdomain (e.g. email.mg.mydnsexample.com) within Google Domains. This is why you'll use the shorter value instead of the longer value seen within the Mailgun Control Panel. (As a note, once the text for the Hostname is entered, you'll notice the dynamically generated text beneath the Hostname textbox reflects the longer value from the Mailgun Control Panel).
    Type

    CNAME

    Notes:

    • N/A
    TTL (Seconds)

    300

    Notes:

    • 300 seconds (5 minutes) usually will lead to a swift verification of the record.
    • However, you may set this field to a different value based on your needs.
    Data

    mailgun.org

    Notes:

    • Ensure that only Mailgun's CNAME record is configured for your domain.
      • Having another CNAME record also present will result in unpredictable aliasing of your domain (in short, unreliable downstream behavior).
      • Some DNS providers automatically create a CNAME record for the "email" hostname. It may not always be safe to remove or edit such a record.
      • As such, if your domain already has a non-Mailgun CNAME record, it is almost always the best and safest course of action to use a different domain - or ideally a subdomain - for Mailgun instead.
    • Ensure that the only DNS record configured for the Hostname is the CNAME record.
      • Since the behavior of a CNAME is to alias (point or redirect) requests somewhere else, any other DNS records configured on the same Hostname will never be "seen".
      • When DNS lookups are performed by the services that interact with websites and emails, their lookups are aliased/redirected to another hostname instead. 
      • This would lead to any such records being unverifiable by Mailgun's system as well as hidden from email hosts who upon receipt of an email will attempt to verify whether your domain has the expected DNS records present.
      • As such, if the Hostname your CNAME record is configured on has any other DNS records, it is almost always the best and safest course of action to change the Hostname from "email" to another value that is not used by your other DNS records. 
      • The Host name row (above) in this table explains how to change this value. Once changed, you can proceed with adding the Mailgun CNAME record.
    • Though the CNAME record is "optional" for using Mailgun's system, it is "required" for tracking the open and click rates of your emails as well as rewriting links using HTTPS rather than HTTP.

     

    The domain registrar and nameserver records

    A somewhat common situation we witness concerns a customer having recently migrated (or currently being in the process of migrating) from one DNS hosting provider to another; however, their Mailgun DNS records are failing to verify within their Mailgun Control Panel. Perhaps you yourself are experiencing this exact situation. If so, there is a solution: update the domain's registration information.

    Whenever anyone switches DNS hosting providers (e.g. from DigitalOcean to Google Domains), they must also update their Nameserver (NS) records within their Registrar's system. Your Registrar is the company through whom you purchased the domain and with whom the domain is registered on the Internet. As a note, Google Domains is a Domain Registrar, but they may not be your domain's Registrar.

    If you need assistance identifying the Registrar for your domain, the ICANN WHOIS website can assist you in this task. Alternatively, you can use a MacOS/Linux terminal to obtain this information:

    whois myexampledomain.com

    Scan the output results for the line that contains the Registrar URL information. It is this field that will identify the domain's Registrar and their website.

    For more guidance on updating your registrar and the associated nameserver records to reflect your DNS hosting with Google Domains, please review Google Domains' nameserver documentation and registration documentation (although their documentation discusses only their system, not the systems of other Domain Registrars). Additionally, if you're experiencing a domain registration issue, it is best to reach out to the Registrar directly. Mailgun, in such a scenario, would not have any insight additional to the publicly available WHOIS information mentioned above.

     

    Need Support?

    Our Support Team here at Sinch Mailgun is happy to help! Reach out to us in the Support section of your Mailgun Control Panel, and we'll be with you shortly!